Registration for the 2015 CSTM Conference now available!

The registration page for the 2015 CSTM conference is now live. Please click here if you are interested in registering for the Pre-conference taking place at Cape Breton University June 15-16, or the conference taking place June 17-19!

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CSTM Emerging Scholars Program

The CSTM Emerging Scholars Program matches students with established scholars/professionals in a related area of interest. Mentors help to provide access to professional networks, advice on developing a career, and feedback on work presented at the CSTM Annual Conference. Students and mentors meet once a year at the CSTM Annual Conference and may correspond throughout the year.

For more information, click here:  http://www.yorku.ca/cstm/Documents/CSTM%20Emerging%20Scholars%20Program%202015.pdf

 

Canadian Society for Traditional Music Emerging Scholars Program

The CSTM Emerging Scholars Program matches students with established scholars/professionals in a related area of interest. Mentors help to provide access to professional networks, advice on developing a career, and feedback on work presented at the CSTM Annual Conference. Students and mentors meet once a year at the CSTM Annual Conference and may correspond throughout the year.

For more information, click here:  http://www.yorku.ca/cstm/Documents/CSTM%20Emerging%20Scholars%20Program%202015.pdf

SSHRC Connections Grant Awarded to Exhibiting Sound!

We are delighted to announce that The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) has awarded $62,745 to Michael Frishkopf (University of Alberta) and Marcia Ostashewski (Cape Breton University) for Exhibiting Sound!  Scott Smallwood and Regula Qureshi (U Alberta), Beverley Diamond (Memorial U), Jeff Todd Titon (Brown U), Michael Cohen (U Aizu), Judith Klassen (Canadian Museum of History), Kaley Mason (U Chicago), Dylan Robinson (Queens U), and Chris MacDonald (Cape Breton U) are also part of the Exhibiting Sound research team. This project is facilitated through partnerships with several heritage, arts and community institutions, including museums, galleries, archives, arts organizations and cultural centres. The Connection Grants competition will fund the events “Curating Ethnomusicology,” the Canadian Society for Traditional Music’s pre-conference workshop in the digital humanities taking place at Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia from June 15th-16th 2015, and “Exhibiting Sound,” to take place at the University of Alberta and in Edmonton galleries, museums and cultural centres from October 29th – November 1st, 2015SSHRC Connection Grants support events and outreach activities geared toward short-term, targeted knowledge mobilization initiatives. These events and activities represent opportunities to exchange knowledge and to engage on research issues of value to those participating.
Congratulations! And our tremendous thanks to SSHRC and all of our partners.

CFP Deadline Extended for Ethnologies Special Issue – Exhibiting Soundscapes to July 15th, 2015

Ethnologies is publishing a special issue, showcasing the theme, “Exhibiting Soundscapes.” The guest editors, Michael Frishkopf (U Alberta) and Marcia Ostashewski (Cape Breton University) call for papers that engage with any aspect of curating or displaying music. The deadline has now been extended to July 15th 2015!

Learn more about the call for papers here.

SSHRC Connections Grant Awarded to Exhibiting Sound!

We are delighted to announce that The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) has awarded $62,745 to Michael Frishkopf (University of Alberta) and Marcia Ostashewski (Cape Breton University) for Exhibiting Sound!  Scott Smallwood and Regula Qureshi (U Alberta), Beverley Diamond (Memorial U), Jeff Todd Titon (Brown U), Michael Cohen (U Aizu), Judith Klassen (Canadian Museum of History), Kaley Mason (U Chicago), Dylan Robinson (Queens U), and Chris MacDonald (Cape Breton U) are also part of the Exhibiting Sound research team. This project is facilitated through partnerships with several heritage, arts and community institutions, including museums, galleries, archives, arts organizations and cultural centres. The Connection Grants competition will fund the events “Curating Ethnomusicology,” the Canadian Society for Traditional Music’s pre-conference workshop in the digital humanities taking place at Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia from June 15th-16th 2015, and “Exhibiting Sound,” to take place at the University of Alberta and in Edmonton galleries, museums and cultural centres from October 29th – November 1st, 2015SSHRC Connection Grants support events and outreach activities geared toward short-term, targeted knowledge mobilization initiatives. These events and activities represent opportunities to exchange knowledge and to engage on research issues of value to those participating.
Congratulations! And our tremendous thanks to SSHRC and all of our partners.

Jeff Todd Titon’s field recordings of Old Regular Baptist singing added to the US National Registry of Recordings

Jeff Todd Titon’s field recordings of Old Regular Baptist singing have been newly selected for the US National Registry of Recordings! Recordings are chosen on account of their historical, cultural, and/or artistic merit for recognition and special preservation by the Library of Congress. Less than a half dozen ethnomusicologists have had recordings chosen for this honour. Titon joins a group that includes Frances Densmore, George Herzog and Franz Boas, Dave McAllester, and Alan Lomax.

Read more about Titon’s recordings on our blog: http://exhibitingsound.ca/2015/02/06/curating-culture-sustaining-music/

Folkways in Wonderland: A Cyberworld Exhibition of Sound

Folkways in Wonderland (FiW) is a collaboration between Professor Michael Cohen and doctoral student Rasika Ranaweera at the University of Aizu, Professor Michael Frishkopf and folkwaysAlive! at the University of Alberta, and Smithsonian Folkways at the Smithsonian Institution.

Folkways in Wonderland  is (cyber [world) music], an immersive, collaborative virtual reality environment facilitating a new way to browse curated music of the world. FiW users are represented by avatars inhabiting a giant cylindrical map, in which a carefully curated selection of geotagged Smithsonian Folkways track segments are embedded as virtual speakers generating spatial sound. Users can navigate freely, listen to tracks together, browse metadata, communicate with one another via text or voice chat, or enjoy preprogrammed tours.

Continue reading Folkways in Wonderland: A Cyberworld Exhibition of Sound

Curating Culture, Sustaining Music – Jeff Todd Titon

The following three paragraphs are part of the supporting materials for a grant application for the “Exhibiting Sound” project. The granting agency had asked me to write a page describing my appropriate prior “relevant experience” in exhibiting sound. I’ve never been comfortable exhibiting myself, but knowing that a honk of my horn would mean a stronger proposal, I honked it. I ran it by Marcia Ostashewski to make sure it met with her approval, whereupon she said yes and asked if she also could use it and the sound clip for a blog entry. I said that would be fine, and so here it is. –Jeff Todd Titon, 2015.

“Collaborating with musicians and their communities to help them sustain their traditional musical cultures and make them more resilient characterizes much of my work during more than 45 years as an ethnomusicologist and folklorist. Most of it has been in the US; but my mother was born in Canada (Edmonton), and I have crossed the border many times. In graduate school before I knew what curating or ethnomusicology was, I helped blues musicians’ careers when my interviews were published in blues magazines, leading to recording contracts and concert gigs. I did it out of a sense of reciprocity; after all, they were helping me learn their music. I’ve been a regular presenter at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, beginning in 1976, and at other festivals; I’ve made and exhibited documentary films on music and musicians; I’m the author or editor of more than seven books honoring, interpreting and celebrating expressive culture. A few days ago I gave the Botkin Lecture at the Library of Congress, where I spoke to a standing room only crowd in the Pickford Theatre about my field of applied ethnomusicology, in which scholars put knowledge to practical use, informed by a sense of social responsibility and justice, in a community for a musical benefit and a cultural good.

Continue reading Curating Culture, Sustaining Music – Jeff Todd Titon